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Evening Update: Trudeau vows action on MMIWG; Sudanese security forces kill as many as 27 in attacks

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Good evening, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Trudeau vows action on MMIWG, stops short of calling deaths a genocide Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stopped short of calling the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls a genocide today , though the final report of the national inquiry […]


Good evening,

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Trudeau vows action on MMIWG, stops short of calling deaths a genocide

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stopped short of calling the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls a genocide today, though the final report of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls used the term dozens of times.

Instead, he said violence against Indigenous women and girls is “not a relic of Canada’s past”, but part of its present, and said his government will develop and implement a national action plan to address violence against Indigenous women, girls, and LGBTQ and two-spirit people.

The report presented 231 “calls to justice” including some that would require substantial systematic changes. Some examples include increasing Indigenous representation on Canadian courts and to fund training and education for Indigenous people to thrive in education, media, policing and other fields.

Chief commissioner Marion Buller said that a complete change is required to dismantle colonialism in Canada.

Sudanese security forces launch attacks on pro-democracy protesters

What is described as the worst violence since Sudan’s military seized power in a coup in April started early this morning, killing as many as 27 people.

Videos on social media showed hundreds of protesters fleeing gunfire. Reports say that in some cases security forces burst into hospital compounds to pursue protesters, but leaders of the pro-democracy movement promise they will continue to move forward in their fight.

The military took control after long-ruling president Omar Al-Bashir was ousted. After weeks of negotiation trying to decide how to move forward with civilian rule, these talks came to a halt when the military council insisted on retaining power in the new government.

Trump’s hot and cold Royal visit

U.S. President Donald Trump’s state visit to Britain has gotten off to a controversial start and officials are bracing for tomorrow when tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on central London for an anti-Trump march.

Trump began his three-day visit with a Twitter tirade against London Mayor Sadiq Khan, with whom he has a long-running feud. The mayor fueled the animosity with a newspaper article over the weekend and video today.

The nasty exchanges came against a backdrop of high formality and regal pageantry as members of the Royal Family rolled out the red carpet for Mr. Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their family.

People protesting Trump’s visit plan to march tomorrow from Trafalgar Square to Westminster, and say they will hoist a giant balloon depicting him as an orange baby wearing a diaper.

Opinion: “I would urge Britons to take a long, hard look in the mirror before joining in the anti-Trump clamour. They should reflect on the catastrophic mess British politics has become.” - Niall Ferguson (for subscribers)

“While there is a need to hold Mr. Trump accountable, and to restrict his term of office to no more than four years, the nuclear option of impeachment isn’t the way to do it.” Globe editorial

This is the daily Evening Update newsletter. If you’re reading this on the web, or it was forwarded to you from someone else, you can sign up for Evening Update and more than 20 more Globe newsletters on our newsletter signup page.

China warns its students against studying in the United States

Amid rising tensions between the world’s economic hubs, China’s Ministry of Education is warning its students that they are becoming more likely to be rejected for a U.S. visa, and that they probably won’t be allowed to stay as long with that same visa.

More than 360,000 Chinese students were registered to study in the U.S. in the 2017-18 school year and totaled a third of all foreign students there. Chinese students alone brought US$13.9-billion in economic activity.

This comes as Huawei continues to push to become part of Canada’s next generation of wireless technology, despite concerns from the U.S. over allowing the Chinese tech giant into North America over national security concerns.

Last week, during a visit to Canada, U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence asked Canada to ban Huawei products from entering the country (for subscribers). During the visit, Pence also called on Beijing to release two Canadians who were detained in December in apparent retaliation for the Dec. 1 arrest in Vancouver of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at the request of the U.S.

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

Court rules Enbridge Inc. pipeline assessment inadequate: A Minnesota court has ruled that Enbridge’s final environmental impact statement for its Line 3 replacement project is inadequate, raising the possibility the Canadian crude oil pipeline could face further delays (for subscribers).

Second trial begins for Alberta couple in son’s meningitis death: A new trial began today for David and Collet Stephan, an Alberta couple found guilty in 2016 of failing to provide the necessaries of life for their 19-month-old son Ezekiel, who died of bacterial meningitis (for subscribers).

Caster Semenya allowed to compete without medication: Caster Semenya’s lawyers say the Swiss supreme court has ordered track’s governing body to suspend its testosterone regulations in a temporary ruling, allowing her to compete unrestricted in all female events.

Swedish court rules not to extradite WikiLeaks’ Assange: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should not be extradited to Sweden for a revived rape investigation, but should still be questioned in the case while he is imprisoned in Britain, a Swedish court ruled today (for subscribers).

MARKET WATCH

Trading action was mixed on Wall Street today, and Nasdaq confirmed it was in a correction, dragged down by Alphabet, Facebook and Amazon.com on fears the companies are the targets of U.S. government antitrust regulators.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 4.74 points to 24,819.78, the S&P 500 lost 7.61 points to end at 2,744.45 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 120.13 points to 7,333.02.

Canada’s main stock index slipped as energy stocks dropped with oil prices. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed down 21.60 points at 16,015.89.

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop.

TALKING POINTS

Could corner-store beer affect for our health?

“One thing that is clear from research is that the greatest impact on alcohol consumption comes from pricing policies." - André Picard (For subscribers)

Why has Tiananmen never happened again?

“The bottom line is that people have far more to lose today than they did in 1989, and their ability to organize into any sort of alternative group is constrained like never before.” - Tom Grimmer

LIVING BETTER

Weddings are super-expensive, and not just for the happy couple. Members of the wedding party can spend significant cash on outfits, bachelor/bachelorette events and, of course, gifts. Here are some tips on how to survive wedding season without going broke:

  • Calculate what you can save as early as possible: Tally up all the costs you expect to pay and divide by how many months there are until the wedding. That’s your monthly savings target.
  • Avoid overspending where you can: If the bride or groom are planning an extravagant party, you may need say “I just can’t swing that financially.”
  • Know when to say no: When someone you love asks you to be in their wedding, be sure to crunch the numbers before you say yes.

LONG READ FOR A LONG COMMUTE

As the next federal election approaches, The Globe and Mail will be taking over a global project that will be monitoring political advertising on Facebook.

The tool will allow Facebook users to see the political ads and will send ads encountered by the crowdsourcing project to a database that will help reporters learn how political advertising is reaching voters.

Facebook has become more and more essential as a voter outreach tool. But it has increasingly has been called out for a lack of transparency when it comes to political advertising, something that new updates to the tool hopes to help solve.

Read here to learn more about why The Globe and Mail has become involved in the project and how you can help.

Evening Update is written by Sierra Bein. If you’d like to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go here to sign up. If you have any feedback, send us a note.

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