Home / Overview Of Current News / Business / Money: Trudeau Poised to Advance Pipeline to Quell Oil Industry Furor

Money: Trudeau Poised to Advance Pipeline to Quell Oil Industry Furor


Trudeau appoints first ambassador to advance women, peace and security


Trudeau appoints first ambassador to advance women, peace and security
OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has appointed Canada’s first ambassador for women, peace and security. Jacqueline O’Neill, who has served on a number of related international bodies, assumes the new diplomatic post designed to advance the Liberal government’s feminist foreign policy. O’Neill will also provide advice to the government on how to protect the rights of women and girls who face violence and insecurity. Since 2011, she has served as a federal adviser on advancing peace and security for women. She has helped create policies on gender and security in NATO, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, and the United Nations.

The Trudeau government treated Donald Trump’s election as “positive news” for Canada’s energy industry and welcomed the help of Canada’s main corporate oil group in The Liberal government has strongly backed the export of Alberta tar sands via the Keystone XL pipeline , which was initially

From Canada’s corporate media, oil industry , and big business as a whole there is a deafening clamour for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Some are urging Trudeau invoke the Emergencies Act, the successor to Canada’s notorious War Measures Act. Others that Ottawa deploy the army.

Trudeau Poised to Advance Pipeline to Quell Oil Industry Furor© Bloomberg Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, speaks during a news conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on Thursday, March 7, 2019.

(Bloomberg) — Justin Trudeau is poised to give the green light to a major crude pipeline as he faces rising calls to support Canada’s struggling oil industry.

The prime minister’s cabinet is widely expected to give the go-ahead at a meeting Tuesday to the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline from Alberta to Vancouver that would add 590,000 barrels of daily shipping capacity, a 15% boost to Western Canada’s current 4 million. The project would still need to get local building permits, overcome legal challenges and likely face pushback from environmentalists.


Trudeau appoints first ambassador to advance women, peace and security


Trudeau appoints first ambassador to advance women, peace and security
OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has appointed Canada’s first ambassador for women, peace and security. Jacqueline O’Neill, who has served on a number of related international bodies, assumes the new diplomatic post designed to advance the Liberal government’s feminist foreign policy. O’Neill will also provide advice to the government on how to protect the rights of women and girls who face violence and insecurity. Since 2011, she has served as a federal adviser on advancing peace and security for women. She has helped create policies on gender and security in NATO, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, and the United Nations.

PM says he is prepared to use taxpayer dollars to fund controversial expansion opponents say will have serious environmental consequences.

Отмена. Месяц бесплатно. Trudeau defends oil pipelines message in Calgary. CBC News. Загрузка Justin Trudeau faces testy crowd in defending his case for the oilsands during his Townhall.

The expansion could be the last pipeline to get built under current permitting rules and would go a long way to improve investor sentiment on the Canadian energy sector. The industry’s outlook has grown increasingly gloomy as key conduits get delayed and two environmental bills stir fears that no other project will ever get off the ground. Investment in the oil sands is on track to decline for the fifth straight year as major foreign operators like Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Marathon Oil Corp. left for lower-cost areas.

“Business leaders and people are saying that Canada is not open for business, and that certainly appears to be the case with the new bills coming through,” said Laura Lau, who helps manage about C$1.6 billion ($1.2 billion) at Brompton Corp. in Toronto. “Trans Mountain will help, but there will need to be a few other moves as well.”


Corbella: Will pipeline approval quell western separatism rise caused by Trudeau?


Corbella: Will pipeline approval quell western separatism rise caused by Trudeau?
In a thumbing of his nose to the West on Wednesday, Justin Trudeau’s federal government announced that it would reject most of the amendments to Bill C-69 — the no more pipelines act — that were proposed by the Senate after much study and testimony. Experts say that as a result of the arbitrary measures contained in the bill, that will allow the minister of the environment to veto an approved project “just because,” no corporation would risk hundreds of millions of dollars trying to win approval of a large infrastructure project, like a pipeline, should this bill pass without the 188 amendments recommended by the Senate.

Clogged pipelines have made discounts on Canadian oil even steeper than they were earlier this year when Scotiabank warned that they may cost the country’s economy C billion. Ensuring at least one pipeline is built is critical to Trudeau ’s plans, with a Canadian election expected next autumn.

The words tone deaf come to mind. This past week, the day after the fall economic update from the federal government, some bright spark in PM’s office decided to send Justin Trudeau to Calgary . He was greeted by loud protests outside his speaking venue and tepid if polite applause as he spoke to

The industry has already been hit in recent years by the cancellation of TC Energy Corp.’s Energy East pipeline and Trudeau’s rejection of Enbridge Inc.’s proposed Northern Gateway conduit.

Trans Mountain currently represents the sole made-in-Canada option — there are two other pipelines working their way through the U.S. regulatory process — to an industry that has been hamstrung by a lack of shipping capacity weighing on local heavy crude prices and preventing production increases.

Trudeau’s government bought the pipeline last year from Kinder Morgan Inc. in a bid to save its expansion, only to see a court strike down the permit due to lack of consultations. That ruling set out a framework for the current approval by adding additional regulatory requirements and outlining the need for more consultation with indigenous communities.

With a positive decision on Tuesday, the cabinet would ostensibly be certifying that enough has been done to pass legal muster.


Don’t waste any more money on the Trans Mountain pipeline


Don’t waste any more money on the Trans Mountain pipeline
Justin Trudeau is in over a barrel. In 2015, he made a deal with Alberta. He would get an oil pipeline built to a coast if the province joined his pan-Canadian climate plan. After his election this past April, Conservative Alberta Premier Jason Kenney ripped up Alberta’s side of the bargain and declared war on Trudeau‘s climate plan. What should Ottawa do now after being jilted by Alberta? Should the Liberal government maintain its side of the bargain, and proceed with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to the Vancouver area and lose credibility as a climate warrior? Or should it kill the pipeline expansion now and say this was a bargain gone bad.

The oil industry -backed bill – which House GOP leadership hopes to bring before the full chamber this summer – would require an Obama The House Energy and Commerce Committee is slated to vote on a bill aimed at accelerating federal approval of a controversial pipeline that would expand U.S

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is pledging financial backing and legislation to ensure that the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is completed, after B.C. Premier John Horgan gave no ground at a hastily called meeting in Ottawa on Sunday. Emerging from a two-hour session on Parliament Hill, Mr

The project is crucial for Trudeau politically. His Liberals, heading into elections in October trailing in the polls, have staked much of their legacy on forging a grand bargain on resources. The idea is to be more pro-environment and supportive of indigenous concerns in order to win the “social license” for development.

Up to now, the approach has mostly fired up opponents on both sides. In Alberta, there is deep anger toward Trudeau’s environmental policies and little trust in the government’s ability to manage the file, with many Albertans openly talking about separation.

Critics have staged somewhat of an open revolt to two environmental bills working their way through Canada’s parliament this week. The most controversial is known as Bill C-69, which creates a new regime for approvals — referred to in Alberta as the “No-More Pipelines” law. The other is a ban on tanker traffic on the northern coast of neighboring British Columbia. Alberta’s government and the oil sector have actively lobbied to kill or heavily amend the legislation, without success.


David Staples: TMX approved but it’s no time for oil and gas industry to celebrate


David Staples: TMX approved but it's no time for oil and gas industry to celebrate
It’s no time for the Alberta oil and gas industry to celebrate, even with the Trudeau government’s new and hopefully improved approval of the Trans Mountain Expansion pipeline project. The approval is a positive step, but we know how quickly a court challenge or angry protest can thwart a worthy project. No one has yet cracked the new code on how best to proceed with major oil and gas projects in an orderly fashion, which is why Edmonton’s Amarjeet Sohi, the Trudeau government’s minister of natural resources, was in a reflective mood after his government’s big TMX announcement.

A brief introduction to what oil and gas pipelines are, why they exist, their environmental and health impacts, and upcoming proposed projects. Because oil and gas pipelines are well concealed from the public, most individuals are unaware of the existence of the vast network of pipelines .

Trudeau responded Sunday by saying Ottawa will provide some sort of financial backing for the pipeline — details of which will be sorted out in closed-door negotiations with Kinder Morgan — and that his government will pass legislation to assert federal jurisdiction over oil pipelines that cross

Meanwhile, the Trans Mountain expansion could potentially alienate voters in British Columbia, particularly as polls show Trudeau bleeding support to the Green Party.

Legal Challenges

Tuesday’s approval won’t end the legal challenges either. Another judicial review is expected on the latest permit, which will likely be decided on early next year. The government of British Columbia — which opposes the pipeline — is seeking a separate ruling from the Supreme Court on whether it can restrict oil shipments through the province.

There is also work to be done in gaining support from indigenous groups, which the Trudeau government is attempting to do in part by making them stakeholders.

“There is a lot of work ahead of us,” Hal Kvisle, chairman of ARC Resources Ltd., said in an interview on BNN Bloomberg. “The environmental groups will not let this go down easily,” said Kvisle, who is also the former chief executive officer of TransCanada Corp., now known as TC Energy.

The government has said it eventually plans to sell the pipeline, and some combination of First Nations are likely to take a stake in the project along with private buyers such as pension funds.

Even as some indigenous communities in British Columbia have voiced opposition to the pipeline, others are eager to own a stake in Trans Mountain. Project Reconciliation and Iron Coalition, groups formed by First Nations and Metis communities, have arisen to bid on a stake.


McKenna mum on whether feds will hit Trans Mountain approval deadline


McKenna mum on whether feds will hit Trans Mountain approval deadline
“There’s no decision yet but just stay tuned,” Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says.

New oil sands pipelines may be vital for the industry , but opponents are winning.

The pipeline would link oil producers in Canada and North Dakota with refiners and export terminals on the Gulf Coast. It has long been an object of contention For Canada, and especially Prime Minister Justin Trudeau , the pipeline represents a mixed blessing. The pipeline would most likely raise the

The current lack of shipping options sent the industry into a crisis last year, when new production from a few major projects overwhelmed shipping capacity and U.S. refiners had a heavier-than-normal maintenance season. That left Canadian oil with nowhere to go, filling up storage tanks and sending prices to record lows.

The crisis was only alleviated after the Alberta government mandated industry-wide output cuts that took effect this year. The move caused prices to rebound, but has limited how much drillers can produce.

It’s unlikely that the Trans Mountain expansion would come in time to help alleviate the current bottleneck. While construction could begin this year, the project may not come into service until 2022 or 2023.

(A previous version of the story corrected the name of TC Energy)

To contact the reporters on this story: Theophilos Argitis in Ottawa at [email protected];Kevin Orland in Calgary at [email protected];Robert Tuttle in Calgary at [email protected]

To contact the editors responsible for this story: David Scanlan at [email protected], Carlos Caminada, Reg Gale

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

Trans Mountain pipeline protesters rally ahead of final Ottawa decision.


The final decision from federal government to come by June 18 but regardless opponents vow to stop project if it is approved.



Check Also

See more of Fort Mcmurray #468 First Nation on Facebook

See more of Fort Mcmurray #468 First Nation on Facebook

Click here to view original web page at www.facebook.com Click here to view original web …

inquiry-into-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-issues-final-report-with-sweeping-calls-for-change

Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women issues final report with sweeping calls for change

Politics·Live Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women issues final report with sweeping calls for …

in-the-news-today,-july-19

In the news today, July 19

Various vegetables are on display at the Jean Talon Market, on January 11, 2016 in …

%d bloggers like this: