’The Queen is in good company:’ New $10 bill with civil rights advocate launched

’The Queen is in good company:’ New $10 bill with civil rights advocate launched
Share this!

Wanda Robson, sister of Viola Desmond, holds the new $10 bank note featuring Desmond during a press conference in Halifax on Thursday, March 8, 2018. A new $10 banknote featuring Viola Desmond’s portrait will go into circulation in a week, just over 72 years after she was ousted from the whites-only section of a movie theatre in New Glasgow, N.S. Canada’s new $10 bill officially went into circulation Monday, breaking new ground in more ways than one.

The banknote is the first vertically oriented bill in Canada and the first regularly circulating banknote to feature a Canadian woman, civil rights advocate Viola Desmond, on the front.

“The Queen is in good company,” Desmond’s 91-year-old sister Wanda Robson said with a smile at the bill’s official launch held at the Canadian Museum For Human Rights on Monday.

Desmond was arrested after refusing to leave a whites-only section of a theatre in New Glasgow, N.S., in 1946.

It was 63 years later — after Desmond’s death — that the Nova Scotia government issued an apology and pardon.

“It is one thing to accomplish great things when the wind is at your back, but another altogether when society is set up to sit you down,” John Young, chief executive officer of the Canadian Museum For Human Rights, said at the launch ceremony at the museum.

The museum itself is featured on the back of the bill, and the banknote has other human rights elements — an excerpt from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and an eagle feather that the Bank of Canada says is in recognition of the rights of Indigenous people.

Young recounted coming across a Grade 8 student at the museum who saw a picture of Desmond and thought it was Rosa Parks — a United States activist who was arrested for not giving up her bus seat to a white man almost a decade after Desmond’s arrest.

To Young, it was a sign Canadians need to learn more about their own history.
“I hope as more Canadians get to know Viola Desmond, they will also learn the other stories of racism, oppression and injustice that mark Canada’s own human rights journey. Achieving rights for all is a process and we are not there yet.”

Desmond was selected to be on the bill after an open call for nominations and a public opinion survey on the Bank of Canada website.

Robson said her sister would be proud to see the new currency.

“She would say, to herself, ’Well it’s about time that somebody recognized what I did and what so many other people did in their own way,’ ” Robson said.

“She would say that there’s so many other people — just ordinary people — who make a change … a little step here, a little step there.”

(Visited 15 times, 4 visits today)

Share this!

‘The Queen is in good company:’ New $10 bill with civil rights advocate launched

‘The Queen is in good company:’ New $10 bill with civil rights advocate launched
Share this!

The banknote features civil rights activist Viola Desmond — the first Canadian woman to be profiled on a regularly circulating banknote. The Winnipeg-based Canadian Museum for Human Rights is on the other side. (Bank of Canada) Canada’s new $10 bill officially went into circulation Monday, breaking new ground in more ways than one.

The banknote is the first vertically oriented bill in Canada and the first regularly circulating banknote to feature a Canadian woman, civil rights advocate Viola Desmond, on the front.

"The Queen is in good company," Desmond’s 91-year-old sister Wanda Robson said with a smile at the bill’s official launch held at the Canadian Museum For Human Rights on Monday.

Desmond was arrested after refusing to leave a whites-only section of a theatre in New Glasgow, N.S., in 1946.

It was 63 years later — after Desmond’s death — that the Nova Scotia government issued an apology and pardon.

"It is one thing to accomplish great things when the wind is at your back, but another altogether when society is set up to sit you down," John Young, chief executive officer of the Canadian Museum For Human Rights, said at the launch ceremony at the museum.

The museum itself is featured on the back of the bill, and the banknote has other human rights elements — an excerpt from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and an eagle feather that the Bank of Canada says is in recognition of the rights of Indigenous people. ‘Well it’s about time’

Young recounted coming across a Grade 8 student at the museum who saw a picture of Desmond and thought it was Rosa Parks — a United States activist who was arrested for not giving up her bus seat to a white man almost a decade after Desmond’s arrest.

To Young, it was a sign Canadians need to learn more about their own history.

"I hope as more Canadians get to know Viola Desmond, they will also learn the other stories of racism, oppression and injustice that mark Canada’s own human rights journey. Achieving rights for all is a process and we are not there yet." Wanda Robson, sister of Viola Desmond, holds the new $10 banknote in Halifax on Thursday, March 8, 2018. The civil rights icon is the first Canadian woman to be featured on a regularly circulating bank note. (Darren Calabrese/Canadian Press) Desmond was selected to be on the bill after an open call for nominations and a public opinion survey on the Bank of Canada website.

Robson said her sister would be proud to see the new currency.

"She would say, to herself, ‘Well it’s about time that somebody recognized what I did and what so many other people did in their own way,’ " Robson said.

"She would say that there’s so many other people — just ordinary people — who make a change … a little step here, a little step there."

Watch Viola’s sister Wanda Robson spend the first new $10:

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Share this!

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Login

Categories

Quick Info

  • Suicides
  • Marijuana

...Anishinaabe journalist from Hiawatha First Nation based in Toronto. She has been with the Indigenous unit since 2017 focusing on Indigenous life and experiences throughout Ontario. You can reach her...

...health supports for a Nova Scotia First Nation that has seen a string of suicides recently.The ... who are part of the Eskasoni First Nation and its distress line.Chief Bob Gloade of the congress...

...storyteller and academic from Peguis First Nation on Treaty 1 territory in Manitoba. He is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Indigenous literatures and cultures at the University of Calgary. In...

...its second suicide crisis in a decade, an independent audit showed Indigenous Services Canada was ... mental health and suicide crisis happening in many Indigenous communities across Canada."The...

...reaches of Canada’s north to inspire Inuit youth through the game of lacrosse, only to receive an ... and ultimately resilience of the Inuit.cineSarnia will be screening the breakout Canadian film at...

...housing cannabis stores, which means only Thunder Bay, Sault Ste Marie, Sudbury and North Bay meet the current criteria.Couchiching First Nation 'disappointed' with province's cannabis store...

...cannabis lottery will work Why a Wahnapitae First Nation man feels he has a right to sell marijuana ... up retail marijuana for small towns.The province has restricted the first two pot shops in the...

...this market is inside of a single pot. Cow’s innards, cabbage, tomatoes, corn and yucca root. Give... They put all the leftovers in a pot, added boiling water and – bon appetite! Poverty is the...

ProfileHow OCN's leader took the Manitoba First Nation from 'paycheque to paycheque' to cannabis business leader'Blazing a new trail': OCN's new cannabis store believed to be 1st to open on a...

"You have allowed forcible removal of Wet'suwet'en First Nation people from their land," one ... tax, Indigenous rights in Regina town hall Trudeau questioned on pipelines, carbon tax, Indigenous...

The Archives

WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
%d bloggers like this: