Canada’s Indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop — cannabis

Share this!

People look to purchase cannabis products at the Quebec Cannabis Society (SQDC) store, on the day Canada legalizes recreational marijuana, in Montreal. Indigenous entrepreneurs see an opportunity in the market. Thomson Reuters Foundation – In their struggle to regain control over resources and spur economic growth, Canada’s Indigenous communities have found an unlikely ally: cannabis.

Facing higher levels of poverty and unemployment than the general population, many Indigenous people see the marijuana trade as a valuable source of income.

Canada became the first industrialized nation to legalize recreational cannabis on October 17.

While Indigenous entrepreneurs have already been selling cannabis for years, they say legalization could allow them to build fully legal businesses and tap into a market that spans the whole country.

And that could strengthen communities’ fight for self-governance, said Samantha McGuire, manager of cannabis shop the Organic Green Dispensary in Tyendinaga, an Indigenous Mohawk community about 250 km northeast of Toronto.

“The production and distribution of cannabis is our sovereign Indigenous right,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “It is about self-determination.”

Tyendinaga is at the epicentre of Canada’s burgeoning Indigenous-run cannabis trade. Although it has fewer than 5,000 residents, according to the latest census data from 2016, the Mohawk Territory has more than 30 marijuana stores.

From “Peacemaker 420” to “Smoke on the Water,” most shops are located inside mobile homes parked around the rural community, beside a major highway connecting the cities of Toronto and Montreal.

And the trade is profitable, local businesses say.

The owner of Smoke Signals, a cannabis dispensary company with four locations in Tyendinaga, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that he earns between $5,000 and $10,000 per day from cannabis sales.

Canadians spent more than $5 billion on cannabis last year — when it was still illegal — according to government estimates. Self-determination

What is less clear is what will happen to stores like McGuire’s now that legalization has taken effect.

Canada’s provincial governments, rather than the national authorities, are tasked with deciding who can sell cannabis and under what conditions.

In Ontario, where Tyendinaga is located, recreational cannabis can currently only be sold through a government-owned online portal.

The provincial government aims to allow private outlets to sell cannabis by 2019.

But Ontario Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said in August that anyone operating a store like McGuire’s after October 17 will not be able to apply for a licence to run a legal store.“The government doesn’t want to be doing businesses with dispensaries that have been operating illegally,” she said, although she did not mention what would happen to cannabis stores operating on Indigenous reserves.Karine Martel, a spokeswoman for Public Safety Canada, the national department in charge of domestic security, did not confirm or deny whether raids on Indigenous cannabis shops would continue after legalization.“Provincial laws of general application will apply on reserve land unless they conflict with a federal statute” or with bylaws created by local Indigenous councils like the one which governs Tyendinaga, she said in emailed comments.Tyendinaga has not passed a bylaw backing the dispensaries, nor have local police conducted large-scale raids on the dozens of stores operating openly in the community, according to the website of the reserve’s Indigenous band council.McGuire and other Indigenous cannabis traders say provincial rules do not apply to them because historic treaties signed between Mohawks and the national government supersede provincial rules.Indigenous people have sovereignty to decide what happens on their land, said McGuire — and that includes continuing to sell cannabis even after the Oct. 17 deadline.“As far as self-determination goes, cannabis has been part of our ancestors’ history and it is something we have always had the right to distribute, use, possess,” […]

(Visited 3 times, 3 visits today)

Share this!

Canada’s indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop: cannabis

Canada’s indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop: cannabis
Share this!

TYENDINAGA, Canada (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In their struggle to regain control over resources and spur economic growth, Canada’s indigenous communities have found an unlikely ally: cannabis.

Facing higher levels of poverty and unemployment than the general population, many indigenous people see the marijuana trade as a valuable source of income.

Canada became the first industrialized nation to legalize recreational cannabis on Wednesday.

While indigenous entrepreneurs have already been selling cannabis for years, they say legalization could allow them to build fully legal businesses and tap into a market that spans the whole country.

And that could strengthen communities’ fight for self-governance, said Samantha McGuire, manager of cannabis shop the Organic Green Dispensary in Tyendinaga, an indigenous Mohawk community about 250 km northeast of Toronto.

“The production and distribution of cannabis is our sovereign indigenous right,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “It is about self-determination.”

Tyendinaga is at the epicenter of Canada’s burgeoning indigenous-run cannabis trade. Although it has fewer than 5,000 residents, according to the latest census data from 2016, the Mohawk Territory has more than 30 marijuana stores.

From “Peacemaker 420” to “Smoke on the Water”, most shops are located inside mobile homes parked around the rural community, beside a major highway connecting the cities of Toronto and Montreal.

And the trade is profitable, local businesses say.

The owner of Smoke Signals, a cannabis dispensary company with four locations in Tyendinaga, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that he earns between C$5,000 and C$10,000 ($3,800 to $7,700) per day from cannabis sales.

Canadians spent more than C$5 billion on cannabis last year – when it was still illegal – according to government estimates.

SELF-DETERMINATION

What is less clear is what will happen to stores like McGuire’s now that legalization has taken effect.

Canada’s provincial governments, rather than the national authorities, are tasked with deciding who can sell cannabis and under what conditions.

In Ontario, the country’s most populous province and where Tyendinaga is located, recreational cannabis can currently only be sold through a government-owned online portal.

The provincial government aims to allow private outlets to sell cannabis by 2019.But Ontario Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said in August that anyone operating a store like McGuire’s after October 17 will not be able to apply for a license to run a legal store.“The government doesn’t want to be doing businesses with dispensaries that have been operating illegally,” she said, although she did not mention what would happen to cannabis stores operating on indigenous reserves.Karine Martel, a spokeswoman for Public Safety Canada, the national department in charge of domestic security, did not confirm or deny whether raids on indigenous cannabis shops would continue after legalization.“Provincial laws of general application will apply on reserve land unless they conflict with a federal statute” or with bylaws created by local indigenous councils like the one which governs Tyendinaga, she said in emailed comments.Tyendinaga has not passed a bylaw backing the dispensaries, nor have local police conducted large-scale raids on the dozens of stores operating openly in the community, according to the website of the reserve’s indigenous band council.McGuire and other indigenous cannabis traders say provincial rules do not apply to them because historic treaties signed between Mohawks and the national government supersede provincial rules.Indigenous people have sovereignty to decide what happens on their land, said McGuire – and that includes continuing to sell cannabis even after the October 17 deadline.“As far as self-determination goes, cannabis has been part of our ancestors’ history and it is something we have always had the right to distribute, use, possess,” she said.The community received formal rights to the land that McGuire’s store sits on from the British following the War of 1812, […]

(Visited 4 times, 4 visits today)

Share this!

Canada’s indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop – cannabis

Canada’s indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop – cannabis
Share this!

By Chris Arsenault

TYENDINAGA, Canada, Oct 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In their struggle to regain control over resources and spur economic growth, Canada’s indigenous communities have found an unlikely ally: cannabis.

Facing higher levels of poverty and unemployment than the general population, many indigenous people see the marijuana trade as a valuable source of income.

Canada became the first industrialised nation to legalise recreational cannabis on Wednesday.

While indigenous entrepreneurs have already been selling cannabis for years, they say legalisation could allow them to build fully legal businesses and tap into a market that spans the whole country.

And that could strengthen communities’ fight for self-governance, said Samantha McGuire, manager of cannabis shop the Organic Green Dispensary in Tyendinaga, an indigenous Mohawk community about 250 km northeast of Toronto.

"The production and distribution of cannabis is our sovereign indigenous right," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. "It is about self-determination."

Tyendinaga is at the epicentre of Canada’s burgeoning indigenous-run cannabis trade. Although it has fewer than 5,000 residents, according to the latest census data from 2016, the Mohawk Territory has more than 30 marijuana stores.

From "Peacemaker 420" to "Smoke on the Water", most shops are located inside mobile homes parked around the rural community, beside a major highway connecting the cities of Toronto and Montreal.

And the trade is profitable, local businesses say.

The owner of Smoke Signals, a cannabis dispensary company with four locations in Tyendinaga, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that he earns between C$5,000 and C$10,000 ($3,800 to $7,700) per day from cannabis sales.

Canadians spent more than C$5 billion on cannabis last year – when it was still illegal – according to government estimates.

SELF-DETERMINATION

What is less clear is what will happen to stores like McGuire’s now that legalisation has taken effect.

Canada’s provincial governments, rather than the national authorities, are tasked with deciding who can sell cannabis and under what conditions.

In Ontario, the country’s most populous province and where Tyendinaga is located, recreational cannabis can currently only be sold through a government-owned online portal.The provincial government aims to allow private outlets to sell cannabis by 2019.But Ontario Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said in August that anyone operating a store like McGuire’s after October 17 will not be able to apply for a licence to run a legal store."The government doesn’t want to be doing businesses with dispensaries that have been operating illegally," she said, although she did not mention what would happen to cannabis stores operating on indigenous reserves.Karine Martel, a spokeswoman for Public Safety Canada, the national department in charge of domestic security, did not confirm or deny whether raids on indigenous cannabis shops would continue after legalisation."Provincial laws of general application will apply on reserve land unless they conflict with a federal statute" or with bylaws created by local indigenous councils like the one which governs Tyendinaga, she said in emailed comments.Tyendinaga has not passed a bylaw backing the dispensaries, nor have local police conducted large-scale raids on the dozens of stores operating openly in the community, according to the website of the reserve’s indigenous band council.McGuire and other indigenous cannabis traders say provincial rules do not apply to them because historic treaties signed between Mohawks and the national government supersede provincial rules.Indigenous people have sovereignty to decide what happens on their land, said McGuire – and that includes continuing to sell cannabis even after the October 17 deadline."As far as self-determination goes, cannabis has been part of our ancestors’ history and it is something we have always had the right to distribute, use, possess," she said.The community received formal rights to the land that McGuire’s store sits on from the British following […]

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Share this!

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Login

Categories

Quick Info

  • Suicides
  • Marijuana

...First Nation economic development and aboriginal touri= sm initiatives. They will learn about First ... reception hosted by the Yukon First Nation Chamber of Commerce and Kwanlin Dün F= irst Nation. The...

...young Inuit man, Solomon Uyurasuk. He is found dead in an RCMP detachment in a remote Inuit ... murder but the police suggest suicide. As the documentary investigates the truth to Solomon’s death...

"This really is an anti-young person government."Indigenous leaders say they've lost an ally in ... 15 in Ontario foster care are Indigenous, but only make up 4.1 per cent of the population...

...Nunavik's 14 predominantly Inuit communities.Grieving Inuit families blame racism of health-care ... Nunavik believe public services to Indigenous people should be improved.Anautak, 36, said people...

...to Exterminator20 years after suicide seeds, civil society mobilizes in Egypt this week to stop... Civil society and farmer movements protested that these “suicide seeds” would threaten seed-saving...

...officer, who reached out to a local Indigenous cultural centre.Police found a bank card with ... older brother and countless other Indigenous children, would become defined as part the “Sixties...

...recreational marijuana retail operations.Saanich approach towards recreational marijuana business ... for private pot stores Victoria’s decision to revise its recreational marijuana bylaw scheduled...

...is "shameful."Private cannabis stores can sell pot from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., attorney general ... of the province's new cannabis store regulations:Cannabis stores will start opening next year...

...Pratt said.Province urges Sask. First Nation to shut down unpermitted cannabis store on reserveDispute over pot shop on Sask. First Nation may hinge on jurisdiction, treaty rightsTreaty 4 was...

...higher today, thanks to gains in marijuana producers and material stocks on the back of rising gold ... involved individuals who were Indigenous or black. The department has said street checks are a...

The Archives

WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
%d bloggers like this: