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Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy, left, shares a laugh with Wampum belt carrier Victor Alex, as HRM Mayor Michael Savage takes his seat before festivities marking Mi’kmaq Treaty Day at the WTCC in Halifax on Oct. 1, 2015. – The Chronicle Herald 1 October 1986 — Treaty Day is formally recognized on this day in Nova Scotia in recognition of the Treaties which were signed in 1725, 1752, and 1760-61 between the British Crown and the Mi’kmaq people (sometimes referred to as Articles of Peace and Friendship). In the Treaty of 1752 signed between Chief Jean-Baptiste Cope (Kopit in Mi’kmaq, meaning beaver) and British Governor Peregrine Hopson, Oct. 1 was the date designated on which the Mi’kmaq people would receive gifts from the Crown to “renew their friendship and submissions.” Treaty Day is now also the beginning of Mi’kmaq History Month, aimed at promoting public awareness about the Mi’kmaq culture and heritage for all citizens of Nova Scotia. A number of historians differ on how the treaties were defined at the time of their signing and what they currently mean today. Nevertheless, the treaties did establish peace between the Mi’kmaq and the British in which the Mi’kmaq chose to uphold the rule of law through British courts rather than resorting to violence. The annual Treaty Day parade travels through downtown Halifax on Monday. The event celebrates the living treaties of 1752 between the Mi’kmaq and the Crown. 2 October 1758 — The First Nova Scotian General Assembly met at the Court House in Halifax, on the corner of Buckingham and Argyle Streets. This was the first elected legislative assembly to take place in what eventually became Canada. Nineteen of the 22 elected representatives met. Sixteen members were elected for the province at large; four for the township of Halifax; and two for the township of Lunenburg. Many of the representatives were settlers who had arrived from New England. On Aug. 19, 1908, a plaque was unveiled at Province House to honour the sesquicentennial of the first meeting of the General Assembly. It is said that the commemorative plaque also inspired Sir Sandford Fleming to build the Memorial Tower and donate it and the surrounding land to the Province of Nova Scotia – now known also as the Dingle Park. The Memorial Tower was built and the surrounding land was donated by Sir Sandford Fleming who was apparently inspired by a plaque commemorating the sesquicentennial of the first meeting of the of Nova Scotia’s General Assembly. The plaque was unveiled at Province House on Aug. 19, 1908. 3 October 1914 — The First Canadian Contingent leaves for England in the largest convoy ever to cross the Atlantic in the First World War. Over the course of the war, more than 650,000 Canadians would make that fateful crossing. More than 66,000 would not return. On Aug. 27, 2016, the Army Museum at the Halifax Citadel installed the Last Steps memorial on the Halifax waterfront to recognize and pay tribute to the full battalion of Nova Scotia soldiers who fought in the First World War.

4 October 1971 — Crude oil condensate and natural gas was discovered on Sable Island. Nova Scotia’s first offshore well had been drilled in 1967. To date, 127 exploration wells have been drilled offshore Nova Scotia, yielding 23 significant discoveries. Over $1.9 billion has been generated in royalty payments to Nova Scotia from offshore production between 2000-2016 according to Industry AcrossCanada by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers. Canada’s first offshore project, Cohasset-Panuke, commenced oil production in 1992 and ceased production in December 1999. Assembly of Nova Scotia […]

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