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A Canadian company which claims to conduct DNA testing that proves indigenous ancestry is suspected of fraudulently manufacturing results after it failed to distinguish a dog’s genetic material from those of humans.

Viaguard Accu-Metrics, a genetic testing company from Toronto, has reportedly been ‘confirming’ indigenous ancestry for non-Indians so that they can use their status to receive tax and other financial benefits.

The alleged scam was exposed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation .

Louis Cote, a resident of Mascouche, Quebec, was working with the Confederation of Aboriginal People of Canada (CAPC), an organization that represents indigenous Canadians who do not live on recognized reserves.

The group, however, is not recognized by the Assembly of First Nations or the Canadian government. Viaguard Accu-Metrics, a genetic testing company from Toronto, has reportedly been ‘confirming’ indigenous ancestry for non-Indians so that they can use their status to receive tax and other financial benefits Viaguard Accu-Metrics, a genetic testing company from Toronto, has reportedly been ‘confirming’ indigenous ancestry for non-Indians so that they can use their status to receive tax and other financial benefits

The Assembly of First Nations is a Canadian advocacy organization that represents indigenous communities throughout the country.

Canada’s government officially recognizes citizens with aboriginal ancestry by granting them ‘Indian status.’

This status makes them eligible for tax benefits as well as subsidized health care, housing, and education.

Both CAPC and Viaguard Accu-Metrics apparently saw an opportunity to make money off of peoples supposed eligibility for Indian status, CBC is reporting.

Cote was tasked by CAPC to collect DNA samples of those who believed that they were partly aboriginal.

For $250, CAPC would arrange a DNA test for a prospective member. The Confederation of Aboriginal People of Canada (CAPC) is an organization that represents indigenous Canadians who do not live on recognized reserves The Confederation of Aboriginal People of Canada (CAPC) is an organization that represents indigenous Canadians who do not live on recognized reserves

The test would be conducted by Viaguard.

If the test confirmed indigenous ancestry, CAPC would charge an additional $80 for a membership card.

This card would then be used by newly minted aboriginals to claim benefits in the marketplace, though this would be illegal since the Canadian government doesn’t recognize CAPC cards as legally binding documents.

Since CAPC cards bear a resemblance to official Canadian government IDs given to those with Indian Status, they often receive benefits even though they are not legally entitled to them.

Cote began to get suspicious.‘I heard some things that were not straight with these tests,’ he said.‘I thought it was a joke,’ Cote said.‘The company is fooling people … the tests are no good.’So he decided to ask for a DNA test, only this time he would submit two samples – one of his, and one from his girlfriend’s chihuahua, Snoopy.When Cote received the results, he found that both he and Snoopy have indigenous ancestry – 12 per cent Abenaki and 8 per cent Mohawk.‘I don’t feel very good for the people who paid for these tests,’ Cote said.‘They may have paid for nothing.’While CAPC members are not legally entitled to tax exemptions, they take advantage of them anyway. Harvey Tenenbaum (above) heads Viaguard Accu-Metrics. The company has ‘tested’ DNA and ‘confirmed’ that indigenous ancestry – without knowing that DNA samples it received were actually those of dogs Harvey Tenenbaum (above) heads Viaguard Accu-Metrics. The company has ‘tested’ DNA and ‘confirmed’ that indigenous ancestry – without knowing that DNA samples it received were actually those of dogs‘Merchants don’t know the laws, so they will take anything presented to them,’ said Daniel Brabant, a former CAPC member from Quebec who says he has witnessed people […]

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