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VICTORIA — Matilda Borden liked to pour a cup of tea to display her basket making expertise, proving her cups made from material gathered in British Columbia’s forests were watertight, says her granddaughter Brenda Crabtree.

Not one drop would leak, recalls Crabtree, who is also a basket-making artist and Aboriginal programs director at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver.

"She was showing off and it’s really, truly the mark of a master weaver," she said of her grandmother who died in 1975.

Among First Nations, basket weavers have always been held in high regard, said John Haugen of the Nlaka’pamux Nation from B.C.’s Fraser Canyon.

"If you were a good basket maker and somebody else wanted your baskets they would have food to trade with you or other items."

Now the baskets are gaining more notice than just being functional works of art.

Canada recognized Nlaka’pamux basket making for its national historic significance this month with a ceremony at Lytton, about 265 kilometres northeast of Vancouver.

"Historic designations reflect Canada’s rich and varied history and I encourage all Canadians to learn more about Nlaka’pamux basket making and its important contributions to Canada’s heritage," said Jati Sidhu, Mission-Matsqui-Fraser Canyon MP, on behalf of Catherine McKenna, the minister responsible for Parks Canada.

Andrea Laforet, retired director of ethnology and cultural studies at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, said the making, use and trading of coiled basketry has been part of the history of the Indigenous Peoples of the southern Interior of B.C. and parts of Washington state for centuries, if not thousands of years.

"Like many of the utilitarian objects made in Indigenous societies in B.C., they are also works of art," said Laforet, who attended the ceremony in Lytton.

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