B.C.’s child representative ‘appalled’ after ministry’s apprehension of Indigenous baby

B.C.’s child representative ‘appalled’ after ministry’s apprehension of Indigenous baby
Share this!

Bernard Richard, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, has criticized the apprehension of a newborn baby from the Huu-ay-aht First Nations. Angela Sterritt Angela Sterritt is a journalist from the Gitanmaax band of the Gitxsan Nation. Sterritt’s news and current affairs pieces are featured on national and local CBC platforms. Her CBC column ‘Reconcile This’ tackles the tensions between Indigenous people and institutions in B.C.

The chief councillor of the Huu-ay-aht Nation on Vancouver Island says the number of children in his nation being taken into provincial care has reached a crisis level.

Last week, the Huu-ay-aht leadership declared a public health emergency over the issue. The declaration comes after B.C.’s Ministry of Children and Family Development took a three-day-old baby into care in January.

Court documents said the mother was shocked at the apprehension. She was told the baby was taken into care because of her own mother’s history with the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

The case sparked acrimony and a court battle between the Huu-ay-aht Nation and the province.

"The colonial practice of removing children from their families is continuing and continues in a higher number, so that is alarming to me," Chief Councillor Robert Dennis said.

The Huu-ay-aht Nation is comprised of 800 people, including 220 children. Forty-seven of those children — more than 20 per cent — are in ministry care, according to Chief Robert Dennis. Thirty-six of those children are in non-Indigenous homes. Went to court

Last month, the Huu-ay-aht Nation went to B.C. Supreme Court arguing that mother did not have sufficient time to bond with her infant and breastfeed before the baby’s apprehension.

The court ruled that the ministry must provide the mother with daily access to the baby.

But last week, lawyers with the ministry sought to reduce the amount of time the Huu-ay-aht mother could spend with the baby to breastfeed. Huu-ay-aht First Nations Chief Councillor Robert Dennis said he is alarmed at the number of Indigenous children apprehended by authorities. ( Huu-ay-aht First Nation) Bernard Richard, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, said he was shocked about the circumstances of the apprehension and the ministry’s legal bid to reduce the amount of time the mother could spend with her baby.

"I was appalled," Richard said. "They didn’t go to court diligently. They didn’t provide reasons. They had extremely restrictive conditions around breastfeeding. That’s inane as far as I’m concerned."

In a sworn affadavit, the mother said she was only permitted two hours a day with her infant and was not permitted to nurse on the weekends.

"I am quite dumbfounded about how MCFD handled this particular care," Richard added.

A publication ban is in place that protects the identities of the mother, father, child and other family members.

Maegen Giltrow, lawyer for the infant’s mother, said she doesn’t know why the baby was placed in care. Giltrow said it’s the woman’s first child, she’s been observed by a pediatrician who was present after the baby was delivered and there are no issues with drugs or alcohol.

Giltrow said the pediatrician also noted she was a "loving mom who was bonding well with her baby." Ministry ‘making progress’ Minister of Child and Family Development Katrine Conroy said ministry officials are meeting with Huu-ay-aht officials next week.Conroy said the government is making progress on reducing the number of Indigenous children in care in B.C., noting it’s dropped by nearly 100 over the last year.Richard says that’s not good enough."The ministry is saying great things, but on the ground, on the front lines, there are just so very many significant issues to be addressed but that are not being addressed," Richard said.Roberts says the […]

(Visited 7 times, 3 visits today)

Share this!

B.C.’s child representative ‘appalled’ after ministry’s apprehension of Indigenous baby

B.C.’s child representative ‘appalled’ after ministry’s apprehension of Indigenous baby
Share this!

Bernard Richard, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, has criticized the apprehension of a newborn baby from the Huu-ay-aht First Nations. Angela Sterritt Angela Sterritt is a journalist from the Gitanmaax band of the Gitxsan Nation. Sterritt’s news and current affairs pieces are featured on national and local CBC platforms. Her CBC column ‘Reconcile This’ tackles the tensions between Indigenous people and institutions in B.C.

The chief councillor of the Huu-ay-aht Nation on Vancouver Island says the number of children in his nation being taken into provincial care has reached a crisis level.

Last week, the Huu-ay-aht leadership declared a public health emergency over the issue. The declaration comes after B.C.’s Ministry of Children and Family Development took a three-day-old baby into care in January.

Court documents said the mother was shocked at the apprehension. She was told the baby was taken into care because of her own mother’s history with the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

The case sparked acrimony and a court battle between the Huu-ay-aht Nation and the province.

"The colonial practice of removing children from their families is continuing and continues in a higher number, so that is alarming to me," Chief Councillor Robert Dennis said.

The Huu-ay-aht Nation is comprised of 800 people, including 220 children. Forty-seven of those children — more than 20 per cent — are in ministry care, according to Chief Robert Dennis. Thirty-six of those children are in non-Indigenous homes. Went to court

Last month, the Huu-ay-aht Nation went to B.C. Supreme Court arguing that mother did not have sufficient time to bond with her infant and breastfeed before the baby’s apprehension.

The court ruled that the ministry must provide the mother with daily access to the baby.

But last week, lawyers with the ministry sought to reduce the amount of time the Huu-ay-aht mother could spend with the baby to breastfeed. Huu-ay-aht First Nations Chief Councillor Robert Dennis said he is alarmed at the number of Indigenous children apprehended by authorities. ( Huu-ay-aht First Nation) Bernard Richard, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, said he was shocked about the circumstances of the apprehension and the ministry’s legal bid to reduce the amount of time the mother could spend with her baby.

"I was appalled," Richard said. "They didn’t go to court diligently. They didn’t provide reasons. They had extremely restrictive conditions around breastfeeding. That’s inane as far as I’m concerned."

In a sworn affadavit, the mother said she was only permitted two hours a day with her infant and was not permitted to nurse on the weekends.

"I am quite dumbfounded about how MCFD handled this particular care," Richard added.

A publication ban is in place that protects the identities of the mother, father, child and other family members.

Maegen Giltrow, lawyer for the infant’s mother, said she doesn’t know why the baby was placed in care. Giltrow said it’s the woman’s first child, she’s been observed by a pediatrician who was present after the baby was delivered and there are no issues with drugs or alcohol.

Giltrow said the pediatrician also noted she was a "loving mom who was bonding well with her baby." Ministry ‘making progress’ Minister of Child and Family Development Katrine Conroy said ministry officials are meeting with Huu-ay-aht officials next week.Conroy said the government is making progress on reducing the number of Indigenous children in care in B.C., noting it’s dropped by nearly 100 over the last year.Richard says that’s not good enough."The ministry is saying great things, but on the ground, on the front lines, there are just so very many significant issues to be addressed but that are not being addressed," Richard said.Roberts says the […]

(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)

Share this!

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stats

Articles Posted: 8,258

An Update For You

Categories

The Archives

Quick Info

  • Suicides
  • Marijuana

...lead trade missions for women, Indigenous and LGBTQ businesses and entrepreneurs later this year ... attended in his place.In Kabul, a suicide bombing yesterday morning at a voter registration...

...environment, died in a self-immolation suicide as a wake-up call to save the planet. He wrote in a ... must abide by treaties made with Indigenous Peoples. The long history of racism from the founding...

...they are about indigenous health, all too often the focus becomes indigenous illness.He asked the ... indigenous health, Makokis shared that what is needed is a return to the source. For indigenous...

...committee with indigenous communities. For the first time in Canadian history, many indigenous ... made real on the ground by the indigenous people of this country, yet in the middle of what they...

...spent decades working as an Indigenous-relations trainer. He helps everyone from non-profits to government to Fortune 500 companies with Indigenous awareness.In 2015, the Gwawaenuk Nation member...

...whales Trade missions for women, Indigenous and LGBTQ interests in 2018: Champagne Ottawa launches... election Parliament Hill plays host to last annual marijuana rally before legalization North Korea...

...Canada and has shaped the lives of Indigenous people by giving the federal government the power to ... governance and livelihoods, says an Indigenous author.Bob Joseph, author of 21 Things You May Not...

...if the plan is to get through cannabis legalization this fall and move on to something else, that ... regionally-specific policies, a call for an Indigenous health care ombudsman, a suggestion for a...

...particularly with the Tsuut'ina First Nation, which borders the city's southwestern edge.The ... Montreal-based development firm, the First Nation's plans include three major projects:...

...members."We are focused on cannabis. We are not moving forward with any other ... panel on reconciliation with Indigenous people.The policy resolution was proposed by the national...

For The Musicians!

We Help musicians.

Flashback: RedBone – Come & Get Your Love – Featured in Guardians of the Galaxy. Do you remember this song? Brings back memories.

%d bloggers like this: