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Advertise With Us Pair of Winnipeg instructors seek to open dialogue with students on First Nations issues

Family and supporters of Thelma Favel, Tina Fontaine’s great-aunt and the woman who raised her, march Friday, February 23, 2018, in Winnipeg the day after the jury delivered a not-guilty verdict in the 2nd degree murder trial of Raymond Cormier. (John Woods / The Canadian Press files) In the wake of cross-Canada outcry over the verdicts in the Gerald Stanley and Raymond Cormier trials, a pair of Winnipeg teachers are trying to explain the news and debunk stereotypes in the classroom with "ask me anything Indigenous" projects.

Christine M’Lot teaches Grades 10 and 12 English at University of Winnipeg Collegiate.

"With all the things going on in the media right now, the Colten Boushie (case), the Tina Fontaine (case), I knew that the students would be hearing about those things in the news, and so I thought it was the perfect time to start an Indigenous graphic novel and continue to talk about these things," said the instructor who hails from Winnipeg and has family ties to Swan Lake First Nation.

This term, her Grade 10 students are reading Secret Path, by Gord Downie and Jeff Lemire, while the Grade 12s are delving into The Life of Helen Betty Osborne: a Graphic Novel, by David Robertson and Madison Blackstone.

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