Day: January 12, 2018

‘Need not be perfect:’ Judge OKs $90M deal for flooded Manitoba First Nations

Community members gather outside a newly built home in Lake St. Martin First Nation on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017. (Source: Twitter, Josh Crabb) WINNIPEG — A judge has approved a $90-million payout to residents of four Manitoba Indigenous communities that were flooded out almost seven years ago. The settlement resolves a class-action lawsuit filed by members of the Lake St Martin, Dauphin River, Little Saskatchewan and Pinaymootang First Nations. The lawsuit alleged that members of the four First Nations were forced to leave their homes in 2011 when the Manitoba government diverted water from the Assiniboine River to reduce...

Read More

Teslin Tlingit Council, Yukon gov’t agree to co-operate

Teslin Tlingit Council Chief Richard Sidney with Yukon Premier Sandy Silver, signing an intergovernmental agreement in Teslin on Friday. (Government of Yukon) Teslin Tlingit Council (TTC) Chief Richard Sidney calls it a "monumental step" for his First Nation. On Friday, the First Nation signed an intergovernmental agreement with Yukon government, essentially committing both to work together on some shared priorities. "We have an agreement!" Sidney declared to applause as he and Premier Sandy Silver signed the document at a gathering in Teslin. "It’s taken us a while to create this relationship, to establish this understanding," Sidney said. The agreement...

Read More

Northern families hope latest MMIWG inquiry departure doesn’t affect upcoming hearings

A bag collects tear-soaked tissues at a hearing of the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. Every tear shed during the hearings is burned and taken to the next stop of the MMIWG inquiry. (Julia Page/CBC) Northern families expressed a mixture of frustration and hope following the news the executive director of the national inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls had left her post just weeks before scheduled hearings in Yellowknife and Rankin Inlet. The inquiry announced the departure of Debbie Reid on Thursday, making her the second executive director to leave the...

Read More

Survivors, families pained by MMIW executive director’s departure

OTTAWA — Maggy Gisle fought for two decades for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, but she says the current commission isn’t giving her much to cling to. Gisle, an abuse victim, former addict and sex worker who spent 16 years on the Downtown East Side, said Friday she was shocked to find out through the media that the inquiry had lost a second executive director, adding its communication "really sucks." She said she’s been volunteering her time to try to connect Indigenous women who remain on the streets with the commission so their voices...

Read More

Canadian Indigenous Cuisine Celebrated at Edible Canada During Dine Out Festival

Vancouver, BC | Edible Canada is once again using the Dine Out Vancouver Festival as a stage for celebrating Canadian cuisine, this year focusing on the foundational roots by highlighting Indigenous cuisine. The festival, which runs from Friday, January 19 to Sunday, February 4, 2018, offers diners a chance to savour unique culinary experiences through special menus and events at participating restaurants. Edible Canada’s Director of Culinary, Chef Tobias Grignon, is collaborating with Chef Rich Francis of Saskatchewan, one of Canada’s most well-known Indigenous chefs who competed and placed 3rd on Top Chef Canada, to develop a menu that...

Read More

First Ontario indigenous health research network launched at Western

Chantelle Richmond, program leader of the IMNP and associate professor of geography at Western, talks about the new community-based Indigenous health training program. Ontario is now home to a new indigenous mentorship network, and Western University is the hub. The Canadian Institute for Health Research is providing $1 million in funding for the just-launched Indigenous Mentorship Network Program of Ontario . The network will also receive $1.2 million in funds from other partners and groups over the next five years. As of Jan. 11, the research network comprises 13 research institutions with a team of 70 researchers and community...

Read More

Native Women’s Association ‘outraged’ by upheaval at MMIW inquiry

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett speaks during a news conference on the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry in Ottawa on February 15, 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld) OTTAWA – The Native Women’s Association of Canada says it was "shocked" and "outraged" to learn that the federal inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls had lost its executive director — just the latest in a long line of delays and staff departures. The association, which has long called for a commission to examine the root causes of violence toward Indigenous women, says...

Read More

Murder victims’ families ‘surrounded by death’ as connections to homicides and overdoses detailed

From left to right, Clarissa English, her brother Dakota English and her boyfriend Kyle Devine had just moved into a Lethbridge apartment together when they were stabbed to death in 2015. (gofundme.com/Facebook) It was only a few years ago that Kyle Devine was marching in an annual walk in Calgary to remember his slain mother, whose murder has never been solved. This week, Devine’s own killer was sentenced to life in prison for fatally stabbing three people. There was no more poignant example of the catastrophic and sometimes fatal legacy of Canada’s residential school system and history of colonialism...

Read More

Western University launches Ontario’s first Indigenous-led health training network

Chantelle Richmond, right, is the program leader of a new network dedicated to tackling health problems in First Nations communities while simultaneously growing the next generation of Indigenous health scholars. (Colin Butler/CBC News) Western University has announced the creation of Ontario’s first network of Indigenous health training, aimed at allowing Indigenous people a stronger hand in not only participating in health research but directing it in ways that will benefit their local communities. The network officially launched Thursday at Western University and will link the efforts of 13 universities and 70 researchers across Ontario with much of the work...

Read More

Federal Indigenous mental wellness director’s liquor bottle crotch pose photo offends staffers

Jamie Bryan, director of mental wellness, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, poses with a liquor bottle inside a department office on Halloween. (Submitted) Jorge Barrera Jorge Barrera is a Caracas-born, award-winning journalist who has worked across the country and internationally. He is currently working for the CBC Indigenous unit based out of Ottawa. A photograph of a senior federal official posing in a costume, holding a liquor bottle to his crotch, has raised concerns among some civil servants, given the official’s portfolio deals with Indigenous mental wellness, youth suicide, missing and murdered Indigenous women and addictions. The photograph...

Read More

Additional funding announced for Indigenous Policing

File Hills First Nations Police Service is Saskatchewan’s only "self-administered" Indigenous police service. The federal government is following up on its promise to bolster the First Nations Policing Program. On Jan. 10 from Winnipeg, Minister for Public Safety Ralph Goodale announced an additional $291.2 million in funds to improve community policing served under the First Nations Policing Program. According to representatives from the Ministry for Public Safety, the funding is to be used for new hires, improved salaries, additional or renewed training to improve officer safety and new equipment. The funds are not for expansion of the First Nations...

Read More

Move to add Indigenous name to iconic ‘Welcome to Cape Breton’ sign

PORT HAWKESBURY, N.S. — A Cape Breton mayor wants the island’s traditional Mi’kmaq name added to the iconic sign welcoming visitors to the island. The updated sign on bridge linking the island to the mainland would read “Welcome to Cape Breton/Unama’ki,” adding the name used by Mi’kmaq residents and institutions. Mayor Brenda Chisholm Beaton of Port Hawkesbury has drafted a letter to Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil asking for the change. The traditional name loosely translates to “Land of Fog.” Chisholm Beaton says the small token would show that First Nations are respected — the island has five Mi’kmaq communities with about 7,500 people. The idea was widely supported during the One Cape Breton summit in November by members of municipalities and First Nations communities. “To have Unama’ki added to the Welcome to Cape Breton sign, it would be very symbolic of our shared history,” said Chisholm Beaton. “We are here on unceded ancestral Mi’kmaq territory, and it certainly is like I said a very small token, but it will go a long way with regards toward reconciliation.” (CJFX) Click here to view original web page at...

Read More

Categories

Quick Info

  • Suicides
  • Marijuana

...increased risk of self-harm and suicide.It also breached their right to security of the person ... increased incidence of self-harm and suicide,” Leask wrote in his 54,000-word judgment.Thousands...

...increased risk of self-harm and suicide.It also breached their right to security of the person ... increased incidence of self-harm and suicide,” Leask wrote in his 54,000-word judgment.Thousands...

...Nations, Inuit and Metis youth from across Canada Hon. Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous ... s suicide prevention tools from the platform's global safety experts. "We know that Indigenous...

...inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.Some of this country’s largest ... severe psychological trauma and suicide. CP reports .In The Drilldown: Rail use could ease...

...General’s Award for Outstanding Indigenous Leadership.Bourbonniere, who is a half-time social ... General’s Award for Outstanding Indigenous Leadership.Bourbonniere, who is a half-time social...

...alleged sexual assault, forming an Indigenous women advisory committee or attending events to remember missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.He was also active in the business community...

...located in St. Theresa Point First Nation, Manitoba.On January 12, 2018, Island Lake RCMP ... located in St. Theresa Point First Nation, Manitoba. Police attended the residence and upon further...

First Nation chief says pot dispensary just a 'glorified drug dealer'Marijuana dispensary ... sandwich bag full of marijuana from the dispensary on Wahnapitae First Nation, just north of...

...ones, she said.Eating weed gummies at work? Marijuana rules may take a decade to sort out Male ... complaints and legal action, often by Indigenous groups.The head of one of the largest investment...

...comes to pot.Nathan Pasap, Chief of White Bear First Nation, said the First Nation's leadership ... y First Nation also interestedSakimay First Nation is also interested in becoming a cannabis...

For The Musicians!

We fight for musicians.

Musicians are leaders, uniting us with songs & ideas. CASH Music is a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering artists through free and open tools for the web, story-driven education, and new kinds of funding. Bottom line: we help musicians find careers that are healthy for their art and for them.

https://cashmusic.org/