Day: December 2, 2017

Alleged sexual assault victims can sue N.W.T. gov’t anonymously, judge rules

The two men, both known only as John Doe, are launching a lawsuit against the government for harm the say they suffered while in its care. (Walter Strong/CBC) A Yellowknife judge has ruled two Northwest Territories men can sue the Northwest Territories government anonymously. The two men, both known only as John Doe, are launching a lawsuit against the government for harm the say they suffered while in its care. They claim they were repeatedly sexually abused three decades ago at a child welfare centre in Inuvik. The men want their names to be kept out of court records...

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Quebec Asks Store Clerks To Only Greet Customers In French

A taxi with Bonjour on the side is seen Thursday, November 30, 2017 in Montreal. The National Assembly is formally asking Quebec’s merchants to "warmly" greet their clients with the word "Bonjour," and drop the old standard "Bonjour-hi." QUEBEC — Mariya Sadat greets customers in various languages at the Old Montreal souvenir shop where she works. She’ll use "bonjour," "hi," or, if it seems appropriate, she’ll try a few words of Spanish, Urdu, or German to make them feel welcome. "I want to keep my customers happy and leave them with good memories of when they come to Canada,"...

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Ecole Polytechnique presents $30,000 scholarship in honour of Montreal massacre victims

Order of the White Rose recipient Ella Thomson, pictured Dec. 1, said learning about the massacre was a powerful reminder of the violence women in non-traditional fields have faced. The Winnipeg native is now studying for a PhD at Stanford University. MONTREAL—Ecole Polytechnique has honoured a young female engineering student from Manitoba just days before the 28th anniversary of the 1989 massacre that claimed 14 lives. University of Manitoba graduate Ella Thomson received the Order of the White Rose in a ceremony in Montreal Friday. She received a $30,000 scholarship as well as a necklace and 14 white roses...

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More courageous policy needed to stem AIDS/HIV: Opinion

Virus still disproportionately affects marginalized communities despite some progress on policy, academics say On World AIDS Day, we are seeing red. The red ribbon has long been a potent symbol of HIV/AIDS activism, signifying anger at the bureaucratic red tape that, in the 1980s, delayed release of life-saving treatments to people living with HIV/AIDS. Treatment access and effectiveness have since improved for some living with HIV/AIDS (at least in Canada — the global majority still have unconscionably limited access to HIV/AIDS medications). So why are we still seeing red? Why are we angry today? We are angry because HIV...

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A renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples and Indigenous affairs

In this article, Minister Carolyn Bennett details her key priorities concerning the advancement of Indigenous Affairs in Canada This year, Canada is celebrating the 150 th anniversary of Confederation. Understandably, Indigenous people in Canada are feeling that there is little to celebrate, 150 years of colonial policies, 150 years of racism. The late front man for a famous Canadian rock band “The Tragically Hip” helped us through this year with his observation: “We’ve got 150 years behind us to learn from and 150 years ahead of us. So, we’d better just get to work” (Gordon Downie). As a government,...

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Indigenous feminism: what is it and what does the future hold?

Lenard Monkman with Tasha Spillett, Karen Recollet and Adrienne Huard. (CBC) Lenard Monkman is Anishinaabe from Lake Manitoba First Nation, Treaty 2 territory. He is the co-founder of independent Indigenous media:Red Rising Magazine. He is currently employed as an Associate Producer for CBC Indigenous. One of Tasha Spillett’s earliest memories is of being pulled on a sled by her mother to join a protest at the Manitoba Legislature. It’s a tradition that she hopes to one day continue. Spillett, along with other panellists, dropped by CBC Indigenous Thursday to talk about Indigenous feminism and what it means to her....

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Judge grants stay of part of Quebec’s controversial religious neutrality law

Protesters opposing Quebec’s religious neutrality law, known as Bill 62, demonstrated in Montreal on Nov. 12. A Quebec Superior Court judge has suspended the part of the law that deals with face-coverings. (Graham Hughes/Canadian Press) A Quebec Superior Court judge has granted a temporary suspension of the section of Quebec’s religious neutrality law that deals with face-coverings. Justice Babak Barin granted a stay to Section 10 of the law, which requires anyone who gives or receives public services to do so with their face uncovered. In his decision, Barin goes on to say that Section 10 cannot come back...

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Canada proposes ‘groundbreaking’ NAFTA chapter on Indigenous rights

Kenneth Deer speaks on behalf of the Oneida Nation Council of Chiefs and the Indigenous World Association at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in 2014. (UN World Forum on Indigenous Issues/Facebook) Jorge Barrera is a Caracas-born, award-winning journalist who has worked across the country and internationally. He is currently working for the CBC Indigenous unit based out of Ottawa. Canadian negotiators are pushing to insert a "groundbreaking" chapter on Indigenous rights into the North American Free Trade Agreement, according to a representative from the Haudenosaunee Confederacy who has been...

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Supreme Court’s Peel decision ‘a victory for democracy,’ First Nations say

Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation Chief Roberta Joseph holds up a copy of the Supreme Court decision as Na Cho Nyak Dan First Nation Chief Simon Mervyn (left) and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Chief Bruce Charlie (right) look on during a news conference on Friday in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS) A group of Yukon First Nations and environmental groups say Friday’s decision from the Supreme Court of Canada on the Peel watershed planning process is "a huge victory" for them. "It’s the outcome that we were hoping for," said Roberta Joseph, Chief of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in First Nation, one...

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Mi’kmaq Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy dies at 76

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Rayboud is flanked by Mi’kmaq Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy, left, and Morley Googoo, regional chief for Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, at a meeting of Atlantic MPs and First Nations chiefs in Wolfville, N.S., last August. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press) Mi’kmaq Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy, of Waycobah First Nation in Cape Breton, has died. He was 76. Waycobah Chief Rod Googoo said Sylliboy died peacefully of natural causes on Thursday afternoon at Cape Breton Regional Hospital surrounded by friends and family, including his wife, Marie, and two daughters. Sylliboy was a "humble" and "hard-working" man who was...

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Tribunal rules downtown Edmundston is on Maliseet First Nation land

An independent tribunal declared Wednesday that the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation claim to land that eventually became most of downtown Edmundston is legitimate. (Étienne Dumont/Radio-Canada) A First Nation in northwestern New Brunswick is celebrating a hard-fought legal victory in its claim to land encompassing most of downtown Edmundston. Canada’s Specific Claims tribunal said Wednesday that the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation’s claim to the 3,900 acres, or more than 1,575 hectares, was valid. The band has been fighting for this recognition since 1996. The independent tribunal, established in 2008, is a joint initiative of the federal government and Assembly of...

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MMIWG commissioners to ask Ottawa for more time, as Quebec hearings wrap

MMIWG Chief Commissioner Marion Buller says the inquiry will seek an extension of its two-year mandate, to give commissioners more time to report on what they’ve heard as they have travelled across Canada, listening to Indigenous women’s stories of violence and discrimination. (CBC) Chief Commissioner Marion Buller says the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) will ask the federal government for an extension of its two-year mandate. Buller said staff are still working out just how much more time and money the inquiry needs to compile its report and make recommendations to the government,...

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  • Suicides
  • Marijuana

...missing and murdered indigenous women and girls,” he said. “Our suicide rate among young men and ... his work as national chief.An indigenous honour song and welcoming ritual were performed by Jan...

...support helpline run by indigenous women for indigenous women has expanded across the ... handling crisis calls, offering suicide intervention, and making referrals to applicable...

...someone else too."CBC MUSIC | 5 Indigenous artists you need to know in 2018MULTIMEDIA | ... attended a grant writing workshop, Inuit games and a storytelling circle."It was amazing. I was...

...Tootoo has seen the suicide epidemic in remote Indigenous communities firsthand.In August 2002 ... older brother Terence died by suicide at the age of 22.That’s one of the reasons why, 16 years...

...help those in Indigenous communities with issues like mental health and suicide.“I want to work ... around mental health and teen suicide prevention,” he said. “It’s a national problem.”Brandon...

...of cannabis in the province • First Nation communities will be able to opt-out of cannabis ... First Nation communities on a wide scope of legislative components. For example: • The Cannabis...

Indigenous people fight for rights with new cash crop – CannabisIndigenous entrepreneurs ... al cannabis on Wednesday.While indigenous entrepreneurs have already been selling cannabis for...

With cannabis legalization looming, B.C. based Aura Cannabis and Alberta based Westleaf Cannabis are ... of cannabis. Aura is headquartered in Vancouver — Canada’s unofficial capital of cannabis — and...

...opposites when it comes to marijuana. For years, illegal marijuana dispensaries have flourished in ... handful.Now that recreational marijuana is legal, it’s suddenly the reverse. B.C. has a single...

...First Nation, Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, Opaskwayak Cree Nation (OCN) and Peguis First Nation ... provincial cannabis seller National Access Cannabis Corp. Peguis has also partnered with cannabis...

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