Day: November 4, 2017

Healing Over Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women

An event drawing awareness to missing and murdered indigenous women is being held in Rapid City this weekend. The candlelight vigil honors women that have disappeared. The vigil is meant to help the community heal over losses in their lives and around the world. Andreanne Catt is a video blogger for Seeding Sovereignty and an organizer of the event. She says this just the first step. “You can’t lead a movement, you can’t start a movement until you start healing whatever is broken first. And so I really just want to create a safe space for the victims or the families of missing and murdered indigenous women and help raise awareness because maybe these women are still alive. And it’s really hard to know whether or not.” Catt says organizers want to push the United States Government to start a registry for missing and murdered indigenous women. She says it’s important to have an accurate statistic. “It’s so hard to pin point these numbers down because there’s no registry in the United States. And so it’s not just a South Dakota thing or a North Dakota thing, our women are going missing all over the country. Even in Canada. And Canada has a registry for all the missing and murdered indigenous women—yet the United States doesn’t.” Catt says a registry would make it easier to find these women. The...

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Consider workplace safety in legalized marijuana rules, groups urge

Marijuana use appears to be associated with having more sex researchers have found. (HighGradeRoots / IStock.com) VANCOUVER — New rules for legalized marijuana need to consider the impact on workplaces and clarify the rights of both employers and employees, say some business groups. Ottawa has set July 1 as the deadline for regulations to be in place and many provinces and territories are still working to craft legislation, including British Columbia, where a public consultation on legal pot wrapped up this week. Anita Huberman, CEO of the Surrey Board of Trade, said large and small companies need guidance from...

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An irreplaceable ecological treasure is about to be auctioned off for oil. Will Canada step up?

Finis Dunaway is a history professor at Trent University. Norma Kassi is Vuntut Gwitchin (People of the Lakes), director of Indigenous Collaboration at the Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research. Every year, the Porcupine caribou herd embarks on the longest land migration of any animal on earth. Almost 200,000 animals journey from their wintering grounds in the boreal forests of northwestern Canada and northeastern Alaska, crossing over steep mountains and frozen rivers until, more than 1,000 kilometres later, they reach the coastal plain of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, where they have their young. The Republican-dominated U.S. Congress is poised to hand over this area to oil developers. Through backdoor moves and budget chicanery, American politicians are on the path to destroy a shared ecological resource and threaten the fabric of Arctic Indigenous culture. Canadians need to take notice and voice their concerns – before it is too late. The Arctic Refuge was established by Republican U.S. president Dwight Eisenhower in 1960 and doubled in size 20 years later. A 1980 law granted permanent wilderness protection to large swaths of the 19-million-acre refuge but left the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain in legislative limbo. Ever since, environmental and Indigenous activists in Canada and the United States have stood together to defend the refuge. Despite the enormous odds against them, they have faced down multinational oil corporations and powerful politicians to protect it...

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Strangers: Young adult fiction for an Indigenous audience

In Strangers, a young man returns home to find his community in shambles. (Highwater Press) A supernatural murder mystery set in a First Nation that involves ghosts, a trickster figure, and a young man with a tragic past who has come home after 10 years, is the synopsis of David Alexander Robertson’s new book, Strangers . The book was originally slated to be a television show, but that opportunity didn’t happen. Instead of tossing the story, Robertson decided it would work well as young adult fiction. “I wanted to tell a story involving all First Nation characters, that anybody...

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Thunder Bay students learn about clean water from new Indigenous children’s book

Joanne Robertson reads her new book about Josephine Mandamin to a class in Thunder Bay. They want to inspire kids to protect clean water. (Jackie McKay ) “One day an ounce of water will cost as much as an ounce of gold,” is what an Elder told Josephine Mandamin almost 20 years ago. This lead Madamin to dedicate 14 years of her life to running and participating in water walks to raise awareness about the importance of clean water. Now there’s a children’s book inspired by Mandamin’s journeys. The Water Walker was written and illustrated by Joanne Robertson after...

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Indigenous communities and McMaster lab partner in water quality research

An interdisciplinary team of researchers out of McMaster University will be working with Six Nations of the Grand River and the Lubicon Cree Nation of Little Buffalo in a three-year water quality project. (JD Howell, McMaster University) Two Indigenous communities will be working with a McMaster University research team to study the water on their land to determine the source of contaminants and develop an app that gives real-time updates on the local water quality. Six Nations of the Grand River in Ontario and the Lubicon Cree Nation of Little Buffalo in Alberta will be part of this three-year...

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Arctic explorers, Indigenous knowledge

Capt. Bob Bartlett’s family had a fishing station close to Makkovik and he was familiar with the Inuit, according to one author/researcher. (Ice Man: Captain Bob Bartlett) Arctic explorers, such as Newfoundland and Labrador’s Captain Bob Bartlett, had different attitudes as they interacted with the Inuit during their ventures into frigid, unknown territory a century ago. Bartlett believed he could learn from Indigenous people — which was self-benefiting since it ultimately helped his attempts to reach the North Pole in the early 1900s, according to Maura Hanrahan, the board of governors research chair in Indigenous Studies at the University...

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Team excavates sod house near Iqaluit, with site’s living ancestors standing by

Adamie Naulaq Inookie and his father Inookie Adamie at the Qaummaarviit excavation site, of a sod house that belonged to their ancestors. (Meeka Mike/Inuit Heritage Trust) The first summer of archaeological work has wrapped up in Qaummaarviit Territorial Park, near Iqaluit. The park has 11 sod houses, one of which belonged to Adamie Naulaq Inookie’s ancestors. He is the fourth generation to live in the area. Both he and his father, Inookie Adamie, visited the site this summer. Naulaq Inookie is the park’s traditional steward, so he pointed the team overseeing the project to one of the sod houses...

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Happy Birthday, Joe Boyle: Celebrating a ‘larger-than-life’ Klondike hero

Yukon filmmaker Max Fraser with a cardboard figure of ‘Klondike’ Joe Boyle. ‘It’s hard to fathom that there could be a character out of history that accomplished this many things,’ Fraser said. (Sandi Coleman/CBC) “Klondike” Joe Boyle is not quite a household name in Canada, or even Yukon, and Max Fraser thinks that’s real shame. “He was a man of incredible accomplishments on a number of fronts. And I’m quite passionate about trying to champion his legacy,” said Fraser, a Whitehorse-based filmmaker and history buff. “He was one of many larger-than-life characters out of the Klondike gold rush.” Boyle...

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Canada compensates indigenous taken from families

Toronto — Colleen Cardinal often wondered why her parents turned bright red in the sun but she grew dark along with her sisters. The puzzle was solved when she was a young teen, and the woman she had thought of as her mother disclosed that she had been picked out of a catalog of native children available for adoption. Cardinal was one of thousands of indigenous children taken from their birth families from the 1960s to mid-1980s and sent to live with white families, who officials at the time insisted could give them better care. Many lost touch with...

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Edmonton Indigenous artist in residence honours Treaty 6 in final exhibit

Every piece of art in Dawn Marie Marchand’s final exhibit carries a hint to remind everyone they’re in Treaty 6 territory. Sometimes, it might be something as subtle as six shades of paint. But Marchand hopes people will look closer at each piece to unearth the stories inside. “That’s why I like art, because it’s like unravelling an onion,” Marchand said. “You can actually see so many things if you spend the time.” To mark the end of her year as Edmonton’s first Indigenous artist in residence , Marchand is showcasing some of her work in a final exhibit...

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Letters, photos, diaries from Shingle Point residential school arrive in Inuvik and Aklavik

A student’s handmade card for their teacher ‘Mrs. Butler’ at Shingle Point residential school. (Anglican Church of Canada General Synod Archives) Descendants of former students at St. John’s Eskimo Residential School in Shingle Point, Yukon, will have a chance to reconnect with historical materials personally touched by their family members. Students’ handmade cards for teachers, coloured artwork, letters, photos and teachers’ diaries are among some of the records being brought back up north to Inuvik and Aklavik, N.W.T., where many of the residential school students called home. “It’s the living history of this region,” says Val Marie Johnson, the...

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