Day: September 12, 2017

Forcing artists to think about appropriation important for reconciliation: Kabatay

Indigenous artist Norval Morrisseau’s painting Androgyny in the ballroom at Rideau Hall in Ottawa. Under new rules attempting to curb cultural appropriation of Indigenous artists, the Canada Council for the Arts is requiring artists applying for funding to demonstrate how they have safeguarded against the practice. Art is a powerful thing. And with great power, comes great responsibility. So when the Canada Council for the Arts announced last week it was safeguarding against cultural appropriation of Indigenous art, I was inspired. Indigenous culture has been appropriated countless times, in many different artistic disciplines — not just visual arts. Non-Indigenous...

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Feds rushing to help save endangered Indigenous languages

Up to 90 Indigenous languages are considered endangered. The federal government is co-developing legislation which will aim to protect Indigenous languages. (James Hopkin/CBC) Brandi Morin Brandi Morin, Métis, born and raised in Alberta, possesses a passion for telling Indigenous stories. Based outside Edmonton, Morin has lent her talents to several news organizations, including Indian Country Today Media Network and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network National News. She is now hard at work striving to tell the stories of Canada’s Indigenous peoples to a broader audience. Indigenous languages in Canada are dying out at an alarming rate and in desperate...

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‘Fragments of myself’: Why Shannon Webb-Campbell is championing Bearskin Diary

Shannon Webb-Campbell, a poet, writer and critic, who draws her Mi’kmaq heritage from her father’s side, says her struggle with identity is one reason she is advocating for Carol Daniels’ book Bearskin Diary, the story of an Indigenous girl adopted into a Ukrainian Canadian family. (Marilla Steuter-Martin/CBC) On Wednesday, Sept. 20, CBC co-hosts Turtle Island Reads — a live public event at McGill University’s Tanna Schulich Hall, highlighting stories written by and about Indigenous Canadians. ​ It’s an opportunity to talk about and celebrate Indigenous Canadian writers and connect readers with their stories. Three advocates will each champion one...

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Northern Sask. school principal uses Bruce Lee movie to teach Cree

Cree teacher Simon Bird is using an old Bruce Lee movie to help teach his language. (Simon Bird/Facebook) Most Cree lessons don’t start with the phrase “ostikwanik nipaskawataw” or “I kicked him in the head.” However, Simon Bird isn’t an everyday Cree teacher. Bird, a principal at Senator Allen Bird Memorial School at the Montreal Lake Cree Nation, Sask., has subtitled a clip from an old Bruce Lee movie in an attempt to teach Cree to more people. “Growing up in the north, that’s what we used to watch,” he said. “The humour that’s used in there is basically...

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Iqaluit’s beer and wine store sells 10% of its projected yearly sales in first 4 days

On Friday, some estimated they waited in line over an hour before reaching the counter of the beer and wine store. (Travis Burke/CBC) Iqaluit’s beer and wine store sold 10 per cent of its projected yearly sales in its first four days, according to Dan Carlson, the assistant deputy minister of Nunavut’s Department of Finance. “Sales have been brisk, we’ve always expected [that] and it’s no surprise to us that the first week of sales were quite high. The first four days we sold about $100,000 worth of product,” Carlson said. Initial estimates projected $1 million in product sales...

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Yukon government told sales tax best way to raise revenue

The report by the Yukon Financial Advisory Panel was released at a news conference in Whitehorse Tuesday. (Wayne Vallevand/CBC) A financial panel appointed in May to advise the Yukon government on looming budget deficits says if taxes must be raised, the territory should consider a sales tax. The panel says shifting taxes from income to consumption will also create a more stable source of revenue for the territorial government. It suggests the government save money by looking at sharing services with other governments and contracting out some health care services. Those could include diagnostic services and privately operated surgical...

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Probe of Indigenous deaths should extend beyond Thunder Bay, leaders say

OIPRD Director Gerry McNeilly is leading a systemic review of Thunder Bay’s police department. The Ontario Independent Police Review Director’s office is re-examining nine death investigations handled by the department. All of the northern Ontario cases of murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls should be considered for re-examination by the outside provincial police watchdog body, Indigenous leaders say. On Monday, the Ontario Independent Police Review Director’s office confirmed they were re-examining nine death investigations of murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) that were handled by the Thunder Bay Police Service, dating back to the 1990s. The...

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TIFF adds recognition of Indigenous lands to public screening events

TORONTO – Audiences at the Toronto International Film Festival are used to the string of pre-movie announcements that traditionally unfold before the main attraction: requests to turn off cellphones, kudos to festival volunteers, and shoutouts to the myriad corporate sponsors. This year, it adds a verbal acknowledgment of the Indigenous groups who traditionally occupied the land where festival screenings take place. It’s in step with similar gestures of reconciliation unfolding across Canada, including at Winnipeg Jets hockey games where fans are reminded the ice sits on land formerly used by the Anishinaabe, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and...

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Feds rushing to help save endangered Indigenous languages

Up to 90 Indigenous languages are considered endangered. The federal government is co-developing legislation which will aim to protect Indigenous languages. (James Hopkin/CBC) Brandi Morin Brandi Morin, Métis, born and raised in Alberta, possesses a passion for telling Indigenous stories. Based outside Edmonton, Morin has lent her talents to several news organizations, including Indian Country Today Media Network and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network National News. She is now hard at work striving to tell the stories of Canada’s Indigenous peoples to a broader audience. Indigenous languages in Canada are dying out at an alarming rate and in desperate...

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Potlotek First Nation advised its water is not even safe for washing clothes

The water on Potlotek First Nation has been discoloured occasionally since last year. This photo was taken in Potlotek in September 2016. (CBC) A year after residents of Potlotek First Nation in Cape Breton rallied to protest their dirty drinking water, the community has been advised by Health Canada not to drink the water, bathe in it or even wash clothes in it. On Monday, the band posted an email from Health Canada on its Facebook page saying the latest test results show that concentrations of both manganese and iron in the drinking water supply exceed the "aesthetic objectives"...

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‘We could all be dying’: Grassy Narrows, Ont., youth suffer mercury poisoning consequences

Azraya Kokopenace, overwhelmed by grief after her brother’s death in April 2016, headed for Kenora, 90 kilometres away, in hopes of finding help, says her family. (Marlin Kokopenace/Facebook) After Chayna Loon’s cousin died, it seemed like things couldn’t get worse. And then they did. Chayna — who prefers to be called, Shy — lost her cousin Calvin Kokopenace in 2014. He was 17 then, like Loon is now. Calvin Kokopenace was affected by the mercury poisoning that is endemic in Grassy Narrows First Nation after decades of industrial contamination from a pulp mill upstream in Dryden, Ont. He died...

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Lower Similkameen Indian Band wins right to remove ancestral remains from private property

Members of the Lower Similkameen Indian Band pose for a photo after being granted access to a private property in Cawston, B.C. (Lower Similkameen Indian Band/Facebook) A First Nation in southern B.C. has won its fight to be given access to a private property in order to complete the removal of remains from an ancestral burial site. Members of the Lower Similkameen Indian Band were granted the ministerial order to enter the property in Cawston following a meeting with government officials last week. Natural resource officers cut the lock on a private property near Cawston, B.C. where the Lower...

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...Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Support Network will provide proactive suicide prevention ... national Indigenous leaders on their priorities for improving the health outcomes of Indigenous...

...committed suicide, since her body was wrapped in a duvet cover and weighed down by rocks.The jury has already heard that Tina was raised by her great-aunt on the Sagkeeng First Nation, 120...

...inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut , on ... house. Police ruled her death a suicide — something Komaksiutiksak has had trouble accepting to...

Laura MacKenzie urges Inuit to speak up about what she calls "rampant" child sexual abuse ... inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls on Tuesday morning in Rankin Inlet...

...Erika died by suicide. There was a time we would have said she committed suicide, a word usually ... it suicide. Every year, over nine million people across North America think about suicide while...

...cannabis sectorA growing number of Canadian angel investors are betting on the future of cannabis ... business globally. Full storyIndigenous business conference inspires female entrepreneursBonnie...

...marijuana possession, failing to remain at the scene of an accident, theft of a motor vehicle and theft under $5,000.A Gladue report, which assists judges with sentencing options for people of First...

...national challenges-from legalizing cannabis, to tackling the opioid crisis, to deepening ... meaningful reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.The Federation of Canadian Municipalities is...

...Indigenous peoples, including housing, child care, Aboriginal Friendship Centres, and the Indigenous... The Budget also included historic funding to Indigenous communities seeking to revitalize...

...farmworker housing and growing cannabis on ALR land that need to be addressed.”Popham said she ... on the committee to provide an Indigenous people’s perspective and his interest in expanding his...

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