Day: September 4, 2017

Missing, murdered Indigenous women inquiry to ask for more time

Open this photo in gallery: Michèle Audette, one of four commissioners on the inquiry, said the amount of extra time required has not yet been decided, but a one-year to two-year extension request is being contemplated. The commissioners at the helm of an inquiry examining why a disproportionate number of Indigenous women are killed or go missing in Canada will soon ask the federal government for more time to complete their probe. Michèle Audette, one of four commissioners on the inquiry, said the amount of extra time required has not yet been decided, but a one-year to two-year extension...

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Canada and Tsleil-Waututh Nation take steps to advance reconciliation with signing of Letter of Understanding

Today, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, and Chief Maureen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation signed a Letter of Understanding committing to renew and strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship and advance lasting reconciliation with Canada and the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Canada and the Tsleil-Waututh Nation will now work towards developing an outline for an agreement that will set out the key components and priorities to support the negotiation of a nation-to-nation agreement. Quotes "The Government of Canada is committed to building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples – one built on the recognition of rights, respect,...

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Indigenous bureaucracy grows again

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Justice Minister Jodie Wilson-Raybould mark National Aboriginal Day on Parliament Hill in 2016. (PMO) This week is Premier John Horgan’s first appearance at the B.C. Cabinet and First Nations Leaders’ Gathering, an annual event established by former premier Christy Clark. The province pays expenses to bring together representatives from across the province for meetings in Vancouver. It’s commonly called the “all chiefs” meeting, including as many of B.C.’s 200-odd aboriginal communities as care to go. There will be plenty to talk about this week, from wildfire losses...

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Canada: Indigenous And Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Portfolio To Be Split, In Initial Step Towards Ending The Indian Act And Accelerating The Move To Self-Government

On August 28, 2017, the Federal Government announced a cabinet shuffle that includes plans to split the current Ministry of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) into two distinct Departments: (1) Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and (2) Indigenous Services. The new Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations will be led by the former INAC Minister Carolyn Bennett and in essence will “guide the Government’s forward-looking and transformative work to create a new relationship with Indigenous Peoples.” The new Department will be tasked with improving “nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relationships, to accelerate self-government and self-determination agreements based on new policies, laws and operational practices, and to develop a framework to advance a recognition of rights approach”. Accordingly, the Department will likely deal with matters that currently fall within the Treaties and Aboriginal Government section of INAC, such as the negotiation of land claims/modern treaties, sector specific self-government agreements (i.e. in education, health-care etc.), and specific claims, treaty implementation, and the government’s overall policy and approach to consultation and accommodation. It is likely that the current Policy and Strategy Direction division or at least a large portion of it would also fall under this new department, which would include management of most of the government’s extensive portfolio of Aboriginal litigation (shared with the Department of Justice), coordination with provincial governments on Indigenous issues, and the current reconciliation secretariat. The new Department of...

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All aboard: What it’s like for Inuit taking part in Nunavik health study

(Yves Choquette) Roughly 2,000 Inuit from all 14 Nunavik communities are now taking part in the Qanuilirpitaa? 2017 health study . Qanuilirpitaa? means ‘How are we’ in Inuktitut. It’s happening 15 years after a similar study highlighted a number of health and food security issues for people in the area. (Yves Choquette) People like Philip Nunga, 65, in Inukjuak, donned life jackets for the trip. Participants in the survey will be clinically tested for illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. (Yves Choquette) Participants can shelter from the wind on a barge that ferries them to the CCGS Amundsen....

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Romantic Notions About the Arctic Must Not Forget Indigenous Rights

Canadians’ perceptions of the Arctic are sometimes out of sync with the political and legal realities of the governance of the region, says Danita Catherine Burke, a postdoc at the University of Southern Denmark. Jerry Natanine, the former mayor of Clyde River, Nunavut, helped his community win a recent fight against a National Energy Board decision that would permit seismic testing in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. The Arctic is many things to many people. In Canada, this malleability has made the region an incredibly valuable vehicle for nation-building and identity construction. As a Newfoundland-born international politics scholar and...

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Canada’s Status of Women Minister Votes Against Indigenous Women

The Honourable Maryam Monsef. Photo: Laurelrusswurm/Wikimedia Commons (CC) Members of the Kawartha Truth and Reconciliation Support Group (KTRSG), chaired by Curve Lake resident Alice Olsen Williams, are disappointed with Minister of Status of Women Maryam Monsef’s voting position on Bill S-3 An Act to Amend the Indian Act. As many people know the Senate moved forward a version of Bill S-3 that removed all the sex discrimination in the Indian Act through the inclusion of what is known as the “6(1)a All the Way” clause. Despite this, on June 21 members of the House of Commons voted on their...

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Should more governments apologize for the 60s Scoop?

Sixties Scoop survivors and supporters gather for a demonstration at a Toronto courthouse on Tuesday, August 23, 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michelle Siu) From the 1960s to the early 1980s, social workers across Canada removed at least 20,000 Indigenous children from their homes and placed them in foster or adoptive families, most of whom were white. The federal government essentially sanctioned the program when it allowed the provinces to provide child welfare services in Indigenous communities. This period of time later became known as the "60s Scoop". It caused untold trauma and emotional harm to thousands of families. And some...

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All aboard: Inuit board CCGS Amundsen icebreaker to take part in Nunavik health study

(Yves Choquette) Roughly 2,000 Inuit from all 14 Nunavik communities are now taking part in the Qanuilirpitaa? 2017 health study . Qanuilirpitaa? means ‘How are we’ in Inuktitut. It’s happening 15 years after a similar study highlighted a number of health and food security issues for people in the area. (Yves Choquette) People like Philip Nunga, 65, in Inukjuak, donned life jackets for the trip. Participants in the survey will be clinically tested for illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. (Yves Choquette) Participants can shelter from the wind on a barge that ferries them to the CCGS Amundsen....

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‘Time is crucial’: MMIWG asks for 2-year extension

Michèle Audette, a commissioner with the inquiry, says that additional time is needed after a string of high-profile resignations. (The Canadian Press) The commissioners in charge of the problem-plagued national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls are asking the federal government for a two-year extension to carry out their work. "This is a vast and complex topic," commissioner Michèle Audette told Radio-Canada on Saturday. She said that more time is necessary following the high-profile resignations of seven key staffers since the beginning of 2017. Audette also cited logistical issues and a lack of resources as hampering...

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Massive mural takes shape in downtown Saskatoon

Emmanuel Jarus takes a moment to survey his mural in progress in downtown Saskatoon. (Josh Lynn/CBC) From a distance can take a moment to spot Toronto-based muralist Emmanuel Jarus, a small speck hard at work in a bright blue boom lift, but his work-in-progress on the north face of the First Nations Bank building in downtown Saskatoon is easy to see from blocks away. "I just go one step at a time and think about it small and think about the relationship between shapes," Jarus told CBC Radio’s Saskatoon Morning . "And then I back up and look at...

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How a digital media crash course is giving Indigenous women a ‘positive’ voice

Graduates from the London Ont. program say they flexed their digital media muscles and gained confidence Heather Bressette-Hammond graduated from the first cohort of the Positive Voice program. (Paula Duhatschek/CBC News) When Heather Bressette-Hammond first visited Nokee Kwe, an employment training centre in London, Ont., she just wanted to take a basic literacy course and finish up some high school credits. Instead, she learned how to take photos, design infographics and posters, and even make memes. She did it by telling her own story of what it’s like being an Indigenous women. "It was an empowering experience and it...

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...Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Support Network will provide proactive suicide prevention ... national Indigenous leaders on their priorities for improving the health outcomes of Indigenous...

...committed suicide, since her body was wrapped in a duvet cover and weighed down by rocks.The jury has already heard that Tina was raised by her great-aunt on the Sagkeeng First Nation, 120...

...inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut , on ... house. Police ruled her death a suicide — something Komaksiutiksak has had trouble accepting to...

Laura MacKenzie urges Inuit to speak up about what she calls "rampant" child sexual abuse ... inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls on Tuesday morning in Rankin Inlet...

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